Healthy Lifestyle Choices Could Cut Cancer Rates

Most people know what lifestyle choices will keep the chances of a cancer diagnosis low: Don’t smoke, eat healthy, exercise and get the recommended screenings.
�The price and availability of healthy foods, incentives and opportunities for regular physical activity in schools and communities, advertising content, as well as the availability of insurance coverage for screening tests and treatment for tobacco addiction all influence individual choices. Improved collaboration among government agencies, private companies, nonprofit organizations, health care providers, how to weight loss, policy makers and the Indian public can lead to continued improvements, and more favorable trends that reduce the risk of death from cancer and other chronic diseases,� Cokkinides stated.
One expert agreed that the premise is sound.
“The [cancer society] report provides the public with valuable information about cancer risk and risk reduction. An informed public has the opportunity to make good decisions about healthy lifestyle and modifiable risk factors, and other health behaviors”. The challenge for all of us is putting this information into use every day.
“The ACS has emphasized the importance of smoking cessation programs in reducing the risk for smoking-related cancers,” Schnabel noted. “The link between smoking and cancer is well-established, and an investment of resources into smoking cessation programs would be expected to translate into saving many lives, and relieving the burden of the related cancer from the affected individuals, and from society as a whole.”
The report found that if comprehensive smoke-free laws were passed by states that currently don’t have such laws, there would be 624,000 fewer cancer deaths over the long term and $1.32 billion less in cancer treatment costs over five years.
While there was a modest overall decline in cigarette smoking among adults between 2005 and 2010 (an estimated 21 percent of men and 17 percent of women smoked in 2010), decreases did not occur in all subgroups of smokers, the report said.
Among daily smokers, light smoking (less than 10 cigarettes a day) increased from 16 percent in 2005 to 22 percent in 2010, while heavy smoking declined from 13 percent to 8 percent.
Smoking is not the only area where healthy lifestyle changes are still needed, the report authors said.we need take healthy diet in our eating food.
The report also found that cancer screening rates are not always what they should be.
In a bit of good news, the proportion of girls aged 13 to 17 who started the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination series increased from 25 percent in 2007 to nearly 49 percent in 2010, and about one-third of those girls got all of the three doses required for full coverage. The vaccine protects against the two strains of the virus that cause 70 percent of all cervical cancers.
However, the use of mammograms has not increased since 2000. In 2010, 66.5 percent of women aged 40 and older had a mammogram in the past year. Women without health insurance had the lowest use of mammograms, at 31.5 percent.
Schnabel noted that any efforts to increase overall screening rates would make a difference in cancer death rates.